Monday, November 22, 2010

Change Is Coming - Not If, But When

So today is the National Day of Blogging For Real Education Reform.  Even Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is paying attention, as he noted on his blog today in his post Making Real Progress on School Reform.

While the words from Mr. Duncan sound pretty familiar if you have ever listened to any politicians discuss education, the fact that the folks in Washington are reading blogs and paying attention to social media is encouraging.  Our collective voices can and will make a difference! 

Check out the compilation of  over 100 posts that have already been written today on the Cooperative Catalysts Blog.

While I am not sure if my 12-year old (above) will see a dramatic change in the way he is educated in his public school, I am optimistic that my four-year old (below) will.  Finally, I feel that there is enough of a groundswell out there to help move our public schools away from the outdated model towards some legitimate change.  Today is a true indication of the number of passionate educators out there who will not stop until they get meaningful change and the best news is that this number is growing.

These educators will soon be joined by passionate and informed parents. I know that there are many parents, like myself, who care deeply about the education of their children and that they will request and then demand change.  Social Media is the vehicle that will move things.  It has changed politics, it has changed business, it has changed the media and IT WILL change education.

Our kids can learn about anything, anywhere, at any time.  Some schools, the ones where educators are encouraged to take risks, will lead the way.  In other places, pressure will need to be applied.  The clock is ticking and the question schools need to answer is this: would you like to chart your course or have someone chart it for you?  The tide is turning, stop fighting it because it will eventually turn into a rip current.

For me, I am thankful to work in a community where progress is supported. I hope all of my colleagues have the opportunity to experience the same feeling.

7 comments:

  1. I agree Patrick and have made the plung professionally by at last getting my website up and running (weell just about ) www.carmelcrevola.com
    Twittering now (still very new to me) Getting my Blog up and running over the next couple of months. launching with a consortium in UK loqui.tv professional learning for teachers 24/7 ...I am excited about that!
    Thanks fo rthe Blog. Great job!

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  2. Thank you, Mr. Larkin, for some great articles. I just got through reading the one about Teacher Training in Tech- The Right Way. It inspires me to learn more. I love learning about new technological tools which will enhance my teaching pedagogies, but benefit from it even more when I have the hands-on training. Thank you for the Professional Development days when I have opportunities to do so. Thank you for these great articles as well.

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  3. Patrick, thanks for the positive post, and I love this: "Our kids can learn about anything, anywhere, at any time. Some schools, the ones where educators are encouraged to take risks, will lead the way. In other places, pressure will need to be applied. The clock is ticking and the question schools need to answer is this: would you like to chart your course or have someone chart it for you?"
    I'm so encouraged by administrators like you and teachers everywhere that are taking initiatives to make learning experiences more meaningful for their students each day!

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  4. Patrick,
    Don't forget that part of the reason why you are in a community that supports growth is that you, and others in your district, are modeling how learning can occur through the participatory web. Keep leading and keep modeling and your community will continue to support your efforts.

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  5. Thanks for the positive feedback on the post. Together, we will change things!

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  6. I agree with you that change is coming. In our institution, the biggest road block to change is this thing called a union. It keeps the older teachers who tend to resist change around and the younger ones that want to make changes are the first layoffs.

    It will happen but it isn't happening as quick as I would like. Keep up the good work. Your leadership matters.

    Cheers

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  7. When thinking about change, I can't help but view organizational inertia as the squeaky hinge on the 21st century door.

    Change is indeed coming and it often feels that it is coming at a pace that is too fast to be 'organizationally' managed or supported.

    My goal is not to worry about the bureaucracy but instead focus on what I can do at my school to support my staff - creating structures and loosely organized places where pockets of energy and excellence driven by professional development can exist.

    In embracing change, my hope is that these structures, these ideas, these risk takers can coalesce into a synergy that will help redefine our delivery while retaining our core purpose: helping students become real learners and not just good test takers.

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